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Technology delivering technology

It has been every organization's goal, the industry where they operate included, to have a technology and help run and facilitate every, if not particularly the high-value, area of business.  Sounds just what technology is for almost everything that humans do, including their businesses. Right? It's what the technology team must do and they did.  However, some of the actions they are emulating doesn't seem to be true at all. It's still about technology for the sake of technology. This is not only wrong, it is breaking the very notion that technology is helping people and it is always there whatever they do. When technology arrives and they use it, what happens is the usual messy experience that they already had from the past, and to think they are now on the new ones and still encountering the same problem. Imagine why some organizations can do it better and had been always ahead. Meaning, problems are contained that people didn't even notice there was any, no matte

Worthy of IT practice

People might be in 100% agreement, at least those who are attentive IT practitioners, that about 95% can talk business systems, IT and contiguous facilities but not necessarily capable of executing whatever approximations there are. 

Hard to find are the 5% who can talk and write—context doesn’t deviate when they do—and can execute them properly as well. This makes expensive with everything IT. The complete opposite of IT’s worth the time and investment. 

Why let it continue if we can correct it?

Besides, in their report in Computing Curricula Series, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) says specifically from its Information Technology Curricula 2017 about, The Academic Myththe exact statements are reproduced here:

Students who graduate from a university program assume that the baccalaureate degree is a sufficient qualification to attain a position. This understanding may be true in some fields, but belief in this myth has stymied many job hunters worldwide. The degree credential is likely to be necessary, but it is not a sufficient condition for a position. A general understanding exists in IT and other fields that a successful professional must be a good communicator, a strong team player, and a person with passion to succeed. Hence, having a degree is often not sufficient to secure employment.

Some people believe that a graduate of an IT program who has a high grade-point-average (GPA) is more likely to attain a position than one who has a lower GPA. This belief also has challenges. A graduate having a high GPA is commendable. However, if s/he does not have the passion and drive, or does not work well in teams, or does not communicate effectively, chances are that the person will not pass the first interview.

But that's only when school is finished or one has graduated and already got a baccalaureate degree, which even up to this level, employment or job within IT isn't a surefire. 

What if you didn't attend college but had learned a lot in IT doing some practical and hands-on exercises on your own? We've seen people in this group. They were successful due to their ability to work hard and commit to an objective that they wanted to attain.    

Either one has finished college or not, it's still by way of doing, relentlessly, especially in IT. Making things happen and being able to enable requirements would do a lot and it's a big difference in business-computing systems.  

IT practice is deep and focused on IT applications, overall. Not only areas like infrastructure, software, security and privacy et al but everything that is the IT spectrum. Enabling these different areas to work as one and further match whatever the business and regulations require. It can enhance capabilities and interactions with stakeholders. That IT practitioners when performing on the job, they would immerse themselves to the needs of their organization’s businesses with IT. The most obvious shift is where practitioners must be focusing from IT to business. It must be that IT practitioners are tackling IT invisibly (people love business systems and IT that facilitates their affairs without problems), as they’ve been primarily trained to deal with it the most effective way possible, while directly attending to necessary changes and/or the transformation of business as the main objective of work. Without a concrete plan of actions, stakeholders will not be able to appreciate and experience what IT is supposed to be as a significant enabling mechanism and business facility.

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